Oral Narratives (Sophomore LA)

Talking Voices

ramayana460.jpg

From the Mewar Ramayana

Last week we looked at the ways in which myths are created, the origin of creation myths, the archetypes that exist and persist and the binaries that exist within these narratives. But this is one way to look at the myths that surround us. As these myths begin to cross the borders, both physical and emotional, time and space, we begin to wonder how these stories are disseminated. Continue reading

Standard
Time, Time Seminar, Time Studio

22.02.2015

Calvin and Hobbes - Photography - vertical

Reflecting on our last session that looked at studio photography at the turn of the century, we were able to establish the creation of identity and spaces as generated through symbols and codes. As the camera begins its journey outside of the studio space, our relationship with the camera as functional begins to change – the moments of identity are created by objects in the real world.

Today’s session began to look at the ways in which we create images in the absence of these symbols because the symbols create themselves. Looking at the works of a few 20th century photographers in India, this class looked at the ways in which photographers have addressed the questions of identity and nationhood. Through the works of photographer such as Homai Vyarawalla and Raghu Rai as photo journalists, who were able to capture the moments of power and identity and the negotiation of the two. Their works, which look closely and critically at key figures in Indian history and politics, both Vyarawalla and Rai have been able to draw out of their single frame multiple meanings.

Continue reading

Standard
Oral Narratives (Sophomore LA)

Talking Myths

fig13.jpg

Three Aspects of The Absolute (Mehrangarh Museum Trust, 1823)

One of the first questions we ask ourselves when we read a narrative is ‘who is speaking?’ It is important to establish a voice within the stories that we hear because it is the voice that will determine the ways in which the narrative wants to frame itself. But what about the early myths and creation stories?

Continue reading

Standard
Time, Time Seminar, Time Studio

15.02.2016

We have spoken about time as form, as formless, as linear and circular, time as an expression of memory and time and its relationship with language. These are some of the ways in which we understand time. But how does space determine action and movement? Can space be independent of time and memory? Is time, physical time, determined by the outside? Drawing on examples of early calendars and almanacs we spoke about the calendar as determined by the societies. How societies create calendars that look to the external to determine time flow and passage. Continue reading

Standard
Time, Time Seminar

On Photography – Susan Sontag

cover.jpg.rendition.460.707.png‘Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads — as an anthology of images.’

Read the essay here:

SontagSusan_InPlatosCave

Standard