Integrative Seminar

09.08.16

“But when from a long-distance past nothing subsist, after the people are dead, after the things are broken and scattered, taste and smell alone, more fragile but more enduring, more immaterial, more persistent, more faithful, remain poised a long time, like souls, remembering, waiting, hoping, amid the ruins of the rest; and bear unflinchingly, in the tiny and almost impalpable drop of their essence, the vast structure of recollection.”

Marcel Proust, In Search of Lost Time (Vol. 1)

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Integrative Seminar

Doris Lessing: Talking the Self

“I was born with skins too few. Or they were scrubbed off me by . . . robust and efficient hands.”

This, the first volume of Doris Lessing’s autobiography, begins with her childhood in Africa and ends on her arrival in London in 1949 with the typescript of her first novel, The Grass Is Singing, in her suitcase.

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Time, Time Seminar, Time Studio, Uncategorized

04.04.2016

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We begin our last project for Time Seminar & Studio, our biggest project ever! Here is a brief to the project…

In the early years of an independent India, Indian cinema served as an expression of the creation of identities, of a way of speaking of the ‘ideal’ India – rural India as an expression of change, it spoke of diversity and religious identity and a way to explore the shifting nature of India’s ‘coming into her own’.

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Time, Time Seminar, Time Studio

15.02.2016

We have spoken about time as form, as formless, as linear and circular, time as an expression of memory and time and its relationship with language. These are some of the ways in which we understand time. But how does space determine action and movement? Can space be independent of time and memory? Is time, physical time, determined by the outside? Drawing on examples of early calendars and almanacs we spoke about the calendar as determined by the societies. How societies create calendars that look to the external to determine time flow and passage. Continue reading

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Integrative Seminar, Oral Narratives (Sophomore LA)

Meet Your New Neighbors: An Interview with DW Gibson

How do we tell stories? How do we remember them? D W Gibson explores the narratives of change in city spaces through interviews.

“In cities, trends come, go, and come again; causes rise to prominence, fall by the wayside, and emerge repackaged; neighborhoods flourish or fall out of favor. Condos, cupcake shops, and bike lanes become signifiers; shady buyouts and racist landlords fuel arguments about whether communities are being renewed or decimated.

The word gentrification is in the subtitle of DW Gibson’s most recent oral history, but the author has trouble with it: it’s too broad, he writes, to adequately capture a wide variety of experiences, contexts, and meanings. Several interviewees in his book also seem at odds with the word. One says gentrification doesn’t describe anything in the real world. Another says he doesn’t need to be able to describe it because he knows what it feels like.”

Read the full interview here:

Meet Your New Neighbors: An Interview with DW Gibson

 

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