Integrative Seminar

23.08.2016

When Alice fell down the rabbit hole, Time, as we know it, began to take on new dimensions and her relationship with it began to change; just as her relationship with Space began to alter too. How do Time and Space interact with each other? Can they exist in voids? When they come together what makes them move?

Alice who is dis-located from Time and Space as she knows it begins to draw out the familiar through the lens of the unfamiliar – she talks about Geography and her cat, for example, to explain her current position in the world.

We have spoken about time as form, as formless, as linear and circular, time as an expression of memory and time and its relationship with language. These are some of the ways in which we understand time. But how does space determine action and movement? Can space be independent of time and memory? Is time, physical time, determined by the outside?

But why is this important to us? Why does Alice serve as such a good example as the exploration of the internal and the external self? As the conflicting and unrecognisable self? Alice’s adventures which begin at the top of the rabbit hole take us far into the workings of the human mind as it begins to engage with the ideas of the Self, of the new and many Selves. David Hume in the 17th century talked about the impressions of the Self, what are these impressions and what then is the Self?

Here is video that will probably explain the complexities of Time:

 

 

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Time, Time Seminar, Time Studio

22.02.2015

Calvin and Hobbes - Photography - vertical

Reflecting on our last session that looked at studio photography at the turn of the century, we were able to establish the creation of identity and spaces as generated through symbols and codes. As the camera begins its journey outside of the studio space, our relationship with the camera as functional begins to change – the moments of identity are created by objects in the real world.

Today’s session began to look at the ways in which we create images in the absence of these symbols because the symbols create themselves. Looking at the works of a few 20th century photographers in India, this class looked at the ways in which photographers have addressed the questions of identity and nationhood. Through the works of photographer such as Homai Vyarawalla and Raghu Rai as photo journalists, who were able to capture the moments of power and identity and the negotiation of the two. Their works, which look closely and critically at key figures in Indian history and politics, both Vyarawalla and Rai have been able to draw out of their single frame multiple meanings.

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Time, Time Seminar, Time Studio

15.02.2016

We have spoken about time as form, as formless, as linear and circular, time as an expression of memory and time and its relationship with language. These are some of the ways in which we understand time. But how does space determine action and movement? Can space be independent of time and memory? Is time, physical time, determined by the outside? Drawing on examples of early calendars and almanacs we spoke about the calendar as determined by the societies. How societies create calendars that look to the external to determine time flow and passage. Continue reading

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Time, Time Seminar

01.02.2016

Drawing on last weeks conversations about time and the ways in which we measure it, this weeks class began by questioning the idea of memory and its relationship with time. Last week a student of mine raised an interesting question – ‘would time exist if evolution stopped?’ This led us into an enquiry about the nature of evolution, through thought and action. Could we measure time through the evolution of an idea, for example? Could we, perhaps, separate memory from experience?

"Are we speaking to Mr Duck or Mr Rabbit?"

“Are we speaking to Mr Duck or Mr Rabbit?”

The students seemed quite taken by the relationship between time and language (through moments) and so I introduced them to some of Wittgenstein’s ideas of language, where the visual is the catalyst that creates or destroys the ways in which we receive information. And if this was another way of keeping time could we perhaps assume that it was language that measured time. The conversation moved to the ideas of language as a creation of identity and if language in its written and visual was the creator of the essence of a person’s identity. These ideas, which grew out of conversations between the students and me allowed for us to open up the parameters of understanding time, encountering new ideas and forms as we moved.

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Time, Time Studio

Studio 26.01.16

Our first assignment in the Time Studio explored the nature of time, its relationship with our senses, the passage of time and began with the question: can you tell the time?

The students were asked to close their eyes and respond to three pieces of music, each lasting 15 minutes, while they continued to write or draw their thoughts, calculating the passage of time. Here are the pieces we used:

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